Totally Off Topic – for (modern) church historian-types

My daughter is sitting for her NSW Higher School Certificate in a few months and is reading Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South for one of her English courses. She’s trying to understand the church background to this book set in the UK in the 1800s. She asks:

Do you or any of your Biblioblogger type friends happen to know where I can find data from the 1851 religious census in England? I’ve found lots of stuff about what they did, and breakdowns of the country by regions, but I can’t actually find statistics that tell me useful things, like what percentage of the country were which denomination, despite the fact that the Victorian Web informs me that 14% of the English people were Anglican. I tried following the links that were cited as online resources, and got told where I could buy cheap concert tickets…
I can’t help her. Can anyone else??? I’m sure she’d be happy to share info on cheap concert tickets in return. 🙂
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7 thoughts on “Totally Off Topic – for (modern) church historian-types

  1. Hi,
    I have a photocopy of the 1851 report and summaries that I have used in connection with writing an essay on a local sect here in in Devon, England. If you let me know what it is you woud like to know, I could try and e-mail you some copies of relevant pages . The whole thing however, is rather voluminous.

    The work is difficult to find on the second hand market , as most copies are in institutional libararies, there is one for example in the library of Exeter Cathedral .

    Regards,

    Trevor Coleman

  2. All I’m really after is statistics about the basic breakdown of the country into the major religions – like x% Anglican, y% Catholic, and z% Presbyterian and possibly also methodist/baptist.
    Nothing too complex, cause we’re just looking at shifting paradigms, like the move away from the Church of England to other religions, and the move from religion to science, and statistics will make me sound smart/take up time in my 10 minute speech.

    And mummy, the board of studies site is useless. Wikipedia has much more useful information on the HSC here

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