Amazon and lost books – a good news story

I buy new books from Amazon because it’s often the only place that I can get them for a half-way reasonable price, but I’ve always been a bit wary about them because of the often outrageous prices they charge for second hand books.

At the beginning of last month, I ordered a copy of Ancient Gnosticism, Birger Pearson’s new book (see April DeConick’s review) and it should have arrived by 26 July. When it still hadn’t arrived yesterday, I contacted them, fully expecting to be told that they were very sorry, but… However, I got an almost instantaneous response from a real person saying it looked as though it was lost and asking if I’d like a replacement order or a refund. I asked for a replacement and they have sent it by express international post, although the original was only coming by standard! It should arrive at about the same time as my copy of Layton.

A fascinating little addition was the information that they would be charging $16.50 to my credit card and then refunding it because they had discovered that if they send replacement books with a $0 charge overseas, the lovely people at customs hold them up for ages investigating why. It’s easier and quicker for them simply to charge it and then refund it than to try to deal with customs. 🙂

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One thought on “Amazon and lost books – a good news story

  1. To the extent that the SBL hasn’t gone all out to convene a panel, et. al. on Witherington and Wright, I doubt that Ratzinger’s deserves all that much more attention.

    I’m not all that certain that academics are the foils in the issue making biblical scholarship available to members of the church. This post in CT (http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2007/septemberweb-only/137-52.0.html) points to something more mundane, i.e., economics. The lack of weightier books on theological issues has more to do with publishing a book that will sell as compared to a book that has merit or value on a theological issue. So, the church isn’t so different from the rest of the world after all.

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